Closing a limited company

Posted on 16th May 2024 by Streets Corporate Governance & Regulation


Image to represent Closing a limited company

There are a number of reasons why you may look to close your limited company. This could be because the limited company structure no longer suits your needs, your business is no longer active, or the company is insolvent. You will usually need the agreement of all the company’s directors and shareholders to close down the company.

The method for closing down a limited company depends on whether it is solvent or insolvent. If the company is solvent, you can apply to get the company struck off the Register of Companies or start a members’ voluntary liquidation. The former method is usually the cheapest.

It is the responsibility of the company directors to ensure that all of a company’s assets and liabilities are dealt with before it is dissolved. For example, you have settled any outstanding bills and collected all debts owed to the business. Any assets or rights (but not liabilities) remaining in the company at the date of dissolution can pass to the Crown as ownerless property.

Where a company is insolvent, the creditors’ voluntary liquidation process must be used. There are also special rules where the company has no director, for example if the sole director has passed away.

A company can also elect to become dormant. A company can stay dormant indefinitely, however there are costs associated with this option. This might be done if for example a company is restructuring its operations or wants to retain a company name, brand or trademark. The costs of restarting a dormant company are typically less than starting with a new formation.


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