Exit plans

Posted on 8th July 2024 by Streets Business Support


Image to represent Exit plans

Exit can be seen as quitting, especially if the exit discussed is your business interests.

But actually, business exit planning is an essential part of general business planning. In some respects, it is the most important aspect of business development planning as it shines a light on the timing and value you can expect when you retire.

Without a formal exit strategy, you may rush into a sale or dissolution of your business that undervalues its worth when you decide to hang up your business boots.

Hopefully, when you do retire, it will be from choice. But don’t forget there are numerous factors, ill-health and economic uncertainties for example, that may force you hand, and as we all know, being required to quit is likely to result in your business being disposed of at an undervalue.

Much better to start the planning process now while you still have choices. For example:

  • Do you have family members you can groom for takeover?
  • Do you have a management team who might be interested in a buyout?
  • If you sell to interested third parties, at what value do you set your price tag?

And should you be linking up with an agency to handle the sale for you?

And finally, what are the tax consequences. How much of your likely sales proceeds will you be able to keep?

If you have not yet considered these issues please call so we can consider your options.


No Advice

The content produced and presented by Streets is for general guidance and informational purposes only. It should not be construed as legal, tax, investment, financial or other advice. Furthermore, it should not be considered a recommendation or an offer to sell, or a solicitation of any offer to buy any securities or other form of financial asset. The information provided by Streets is of a general nature and is not specific for any individual or entity. Appropriate and tailored advice or independent research should be obtained before making any such decisions. Streets does not accept any liability for any loss or damage which is incurred from you acting or not acting as a result of obtaining Streets' visual or audible content.

Information

The content used by Streets has been obtained from or is based on sources that we believe to be accurate and reliable. Although reasonable care has been taken in gathering the necessary information, we cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information we publish and we accept no liability for any errors or omissions in material. You should always seek specific advice prior to making any investment, legal or tax decisions.


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