Private residence relief

Posted on 25th September 2022 by Streets Capital Gains Tax


Image to represent Private residence relief

In general, there is no CGT payable on a property disposal which has been used as the main family residence. An investment property which has never been used as a private residence will not qualify. This relief from CGT is commonly known as private residence relief.

Taxpayers are usually entitled to full relief from CGT where all the following conditions are met:

  1. The family home has been the taxpayers only or main residence throughout the period of ownership.
  2. The taxpayer has not let part of the house out - this does not include having a lodger.
  3. No part of the family home has been used exclusively for business purposes (using a room as a temporary or occasional office does not count as exclusive business use).
  4. The garden or grounds including the buildings on them are not greater than 5,000 square metres (just over an acre) in total.
  5. The property was not purchased just to make a gain.

If a property has been occupied at any time as an individual’s private residence, the last 9 months of ownership are disregarded for CGT purposes – even if the individual was not living in the property when it was sold. The time period can be extended to 36 months under certain limited circumstances. There are also special rules for homeowners that work or live away from home.

Married couples and civil partners can only count one property as their main home at any one time.


No Advice

The content produced and presented by Streets is for general guidance and informational purposes only. It should not be construed as legal, tax, investment, financial or other advice. Furthermore, it should not be considered a recommendation or an offer to sell, or a solicitation of any offer to buy any securities or other form of financial asset. The information provided by Streets is of a general nature and is not specific for any individual or entity. Appropriate and tailored advice or independent research should be obtained before making any such decisions. Streets does not accept any liability for any loss or damage which is incurred from you acting or not acting as a result of obtaining Streets' visual or audible content.

Information

The content used by Streets has been obtained from or is based on sources that we believe to be accurate and reliable. Although reasonable care has been taken in gathering the necessary information, we cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information we publish and we accept no liability for any errors or omissions in material. You should always seek specific advice prior to making any investment, legal or tax decisions.


Expert insight and news straight
to your inbox

Related Articles


Gains on sale of shares

Capital Gains Tax (CGT) is normally charged at a simple flat rate of 20% (but see comments below) when you sell shares unless they are in a CGT free investment such as an ISA or qualifying pension. Your gain is usually the difference between what you


CGT Incorporation Relief

Where a taxpayer owns a business as a sole trader or in partnership, a capital gain will be deemed to arise if the business is converted into a company by reference to the market value of the business assets including goodwill. This could give rise


Connected persons for tax purposes

The definition of a connected person for tax purposes varies. A statutory definition of “connected persons” for Capital Gains Tax purposes is set out in Section 286 of the Taxation of Chargeable Gains Act (TCGA) 1992. The legislation


You might also be interested in...