Basis of assessment changing

Posted on 14th November 2022 by Streets Business


Image to represent Basis of assessment changing

Forthcoming 'basis of assessment' reforms will change the way trading income is allocated to tax years for the self-employed. The changes will affect sole traders and partnerships that use an accounting date between 6 April and 30 March. There is no change to the rule for companies.

The reforms will change the basis period from a ‘current year basis’ to a ‘tax year basis’. Under the current rules there can be overlapping basis periods, which charge tax on profits twice and generate corresponding ‘overlap relief’ which is usually given on cessation of the business. The new method of using a ‘tax year basis’ will remove the basis period rules and prevents the creation of further overlap relief.

The new rules will come into effect in the 2024-25 tax year with 2023-24 being a transitional year. During the transitional year, all businesses’ basis periods will be aligned to the tax year and all outstanding overlap relief can be used against profits for that tax year.

Affected businesses in 2023-24 will be assessed on the tax for profits for the:

  • 12-month accounting period they have previously been using; and
  • for the rest of the 2023-24 tax year — minus any overlap relief that may be due — spread over the next 5 tax years.

The changes do not affect sole traders and partnerships who already draw up annual accounts to a date between 31 March and 5 April.

Affected businesses should ensure they are prepared for the changes as there may be cashflow implications. 


No Advice

The content produced and presented by Streets is for general guidance and informational purposes only. It should not be construed as legal, tax, investment, financial or other advice. Furthermore, it should not be considered a recommendation or an offer to sell, or a solicitation of any offer to buy any securities or other form of financial asset. The information provided by Streets is of a general nature and is not specific for any individual or entity. Appropriate and tailored advice or independent research should be obtained before making any such decisions. Streets does not accept any liability for any loss or damage which is incurred from you acting or not acting as a result of obtaining Streets' visual or audible content.

Information

The content used by Streets has been obtained from or is based on sources that we believe to be accurate and reliable. Although reasonable care has been taken in gathering the necessary information, we cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information we publish and we accept no liability for any errors or omissions in material. You should always seek specific advice prior to making any investment, legal or tax decisions.


Expert insight and news straight
to your inbox

Related Articles


Update on the tax status of Double Cab Pick Ups

HMRC had published an update, on 12 February 2024, on the tax status of Double Cab Pick Ups (DCPUs), following a 2020 Court of Appeal judgment. The update announced that effective from 1 July 2024, DCPUs with a payload of one tonne or more would be


Update on the tax status of Double Cab Pick Ups

HMRC have reversed a previous decision (originally published 12 February 2024) on the tax status of Double Cab Pick Ups (DCPUs), following an earlier 2020 Court of Appeal judgment. The earlier decision, now reversed, had announced that effective from 1 July 2024, DCPUs with a payload of one tonne or more would ...


Exempt company purchase of own shares

Most payments a company makes to its shareholders, in respect of their shares, will be qualifying distributions (usually described as dividends) and may be subject to Income Tax. If certain conditions are met, the payment can be treated as an exempt distribution. An exempt distribution is a ...


You might also be interested in...